Brittany

Brittany

In the province of Brittany, France, a dog breed evolved through the breeding by the local farmer/peasants between English and Irish setters with a small local French spaniel. It’s the breed today in the United States known as the Brittany. It is recognized in other places of the world as the Brittany spaniel.

Those early breedings resulted in the Brittany being a leggy pointing dog, standing about twenty-inches at the shoulder, and weighing thirty to forty pounds with medium length of hair. They are the smallest of all the pointing dogs. Colors were and are white/orange, white/liver, with various concentrations of the color, in addition roan with the two colors and also tri-color. The majority of Brittanys are born with a full-length tail that is docked soon after whelping. Some others are born with a naturally bobbed-tail. The Brittany is known for its keen nose and ability to find birds; they are known to be a tough dog with excellent retrieving abilities. They are great family pets, intelligent, loyal to their master, close working hunting dogs — although when developed for field trials, they range greater in horseback events.

The earliest record of the Brittany coming to the United States was in 1912. In the 1930s there were more sportsman who brought the breed to America primarily for hunting purposes. The American Kennel Club formally recognized the breed in 1934. The first all Brittany field trial was held in 1939. Following in 1944, final approval was given by AKC for the breed and its newly formed American Brittany Club. The Brittany, in addition to its popularity as a hunting and field trial dog, has performed equally well in the competition of the show arena. More than any other pointing breed, the Brittany has the greatest number of dual field/show champions.

— Dave Webb